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“Bright” hinges on the relationship between two reluctantly paired police officers: battle-scarred beat cop Daryl Ward (Will Smith) and his idealistic new partner, Nick Jakoby (Joel Edgerton), the first Orc ever allowed on the force.

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“Fairy lives don’t matter today,” Smith cracks in an early creature-exterminating scene, but the sentiment could just as easily apply to all races.

“Bright” may seem cavalier about all that killing, but it sends a message without hammering it home at every turn.

Meanwhile, Landis’ imagination seldom reduces to fit the indie-level productions he’s written so far (including his monster-movie inversion “Victor Frankenstein,” an inspired conceit that comes apart at the seams in the climactic stretch), but here, Netflix has ponied up a budget hefty enough to support the project’s significant visual and practical effects requirements.

Pair that with a Mac Guffin that springs naturally from this fictional world — everybody is scrambling for possession of a magic wand that, should it fall into the hands of something called a “Bright,” has the power to raise the Dark Lord and reopen a battle for the fate of the earth — and Landis has improved significantly on the clunky capture-the-flag conceits at the heart of most Marvel and Transformers movies.

“Bright” is the best Netflix original movie to date, and it absolutely deserves to be seen on the big screen, though don’t let that stop you from watching it home, as “End of Watch” director David Ayer’s welcome return to the cop-movie genre — following a disastrous wrong turn into “Suicide Squad” territory, of which we will say no more — fills an intense, grown-up movie niche that Hollywood once did so well, but has since replaced with formula-driven product.

That’s not to suggest that “Bright” doesn’t stick to the script (this is a Will Smith starring vehicle after all, the most satisfying of its kind since his “Bad Boys” days), though writer Max Landis is something of a pop-culture savant, capable of synthesizing everything from pulp-fiction fantasy to Shane Black action-comedies into a kind of wild and witty blockbuster super-weapon.

We'll be updating it as more details are released, so keep this page bookmarked. The series follows Lyra Belacqua (and Will Parry in the last two books), as they travel through various parallel universes, meeting a host of fantastical creatures including witches and armoured polar bears.

introduces Lyra, an orphan, who lives in a parallel universe in which science, theology and magic are entwined.

Then come the humans, almost none of whom are white; though they tease one another about their ethnic differences, they seem to live in a kind of post-racial, post-gender-segregated equilibrium.

And above that hover the Elves, an elite class who hoard the wealth from a private district, where they spend their days “running the world and shopping.” It’s a complicated social system to establish, and yet, “Bright” does so without relying on traditional exposition, letting interactions between characters — whether it’s orders delivered by a Korean-American commanding officer, played by Margaret Cho, or the chill that arises when Jacoby takes a detour through Elftown — reveal how this hierarchy operates.

Much of the plot involves running from one explosive standoff to another, while attempting to protect Tikka (Lucy Fry, whose ethereal looks and gibberish dialect recall Milla Jovovich’s character in “The Fifth Element”) from a ruthless Elf named Leilah (Noomi Rapace), all while evading corrupt cops, a “Men in Black”-style Magic Task Force (led by Edgar Ramírez), intimidating Orc gangs and a wheelchair-bound cholo who calls himself Poison (Enrique Murciano). With: Will Smith, Joel Edgerton, Noomi Rapace, Lucy Fry, Edgar Ramírez, Jay Hernandez, Andrea Navedo, Enrique Murciano.

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